Just bought the first Pino in Toronto, Canada (maybe)

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Antony

Just bought the first Pino in Toronto, Canada (maybe)

Beitragvon Antony » Fr Apr 18, 2008 3:48 am

Thanks in no small part to the great info on this forum, I just took a chance and paid $5,500 (E3,400) for a Pino, brand new. How good/bad of a deal did I get? Canada has a 13% import duty on bicycles, plus 13% sales tax, so the price is a little higher than it should be... :\

My local bike shop will put the order in tomorrow - is there anything I should have them include in the instructions to the factory? I'm ordering the spring/oil front suspension and lowriders, and the bike shop is going to supply their own fenders and kickstand.

I've read that Hase usually puts the front + rear brake handles on the opposite non-standard sides of the handlebars. Is there anything else that would be worth reminding the factory about at ordering time? Also, we have a deal with the shop for a good discount on all parts+accessories bought on the bike pickup day. Besides panniers for the lowriders and some lights, what else would be worth accessorizing the bike with?

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Wildcate
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Beitragvon Wildcate » Fr Apr 18, 2008 8:18 am

Hello Antony,

that price sounds pretty normal for the Pino, we paid more than 3 grand for ours, too (if I remember correctly, that is).
What do you want to do with the bike? Traveling? Everyday use? Transporting children or goods around town? Ride year-round or only in summer? Ride day and nights/evenings or only very rarely in the dark? If you tell us more, we can give much better recommendations...

If you have the lowrider, be sure to get a large mudflap, like it's sometimes used on the front fender of bikes, to attach to the lowrider. That will protect the captain's feet from water spraying up and (even more important) the main bottom bracket from spray and dirt. We got through our very first back chain at the record speed of 600 km until too long for further use without damaging the cogs (Rohloff chain gauge), just because of the dirt happily eating away at the chain. They last much longer now.

If you want the brakes mounted on the opposite handlebars than normal, say so - but don't be disappointed when it does not come to Canada that way. However, you can easily change that. Just open the little clips that hold the brake cables to the stem and handlebars, carefully unscrew both cables from the brake levers and screw them back on at the other side. Then you only need to fix the clips again.

All the best,
Kati

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Bluepino
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Beitragvon Bluepino » Fr Apr 18, 2008 9:31 am

Congratulations to your Choice Anthony,

the price for a new is very good, it will pay out....sure...
But I m not sure, if you ordered big front Hase-Pinostand, is one of the best extras you can have and as far as I know it cannot be added to the single lowrider later.
Give information to your dealer, if he can supply this.
You can also take both...front and rear, but for me, the front stand would be minimum, especally if Pino is used with children, or high load one the lowriders.
Picture comments:
Upper Picture one Pino with and one without (Pino1 is similar)
Lower picture is not from my recent trip to poland as you can see (joke): :lol:
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Both varations, but Pino1
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Grosser Staender gebraucht....
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always blue skies Manfred (HPV-Mitglied) Fragen an mich: mste200839"ät"aol.com

Gast

Beitragvon Gast » Fr Apr 18, 2008 2:00 pm

Thanks for the quick replies, and good to hear the price was not a rip-off. My girlfriend and I are planning to use the new Pino for everyday trips around the city in day and night, and occasional weekend train/bike tours out into the country. No kids, but I might want to try rigging up a cargo box.

From a few things that I read on this forum (badly translated from German using babelfish) I got the impression that the big front pinostand didn't work too well with the lowriders. Is this true? The big stand is an extra $140, which seems a bit expensive for such a small piece of machinery... but if you say it's very important, then I can call the shop today and change my order! :)

I will have some choice in fenders, since the shop here has a good selection for 20" / 26" wheels, and will make sure to get fronts with good coverage. Is there anything else that might be worthwhile? I hear that the front lowriders can be modified to accept 4 panniers?

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Bluepino
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Beitragvon Bluepino » Fr Apr 18, 2008 10:06 pm

Hi Anthony,
With the big front stand, you need no modification, its the standardversion, you see above, and the load, you can see on many Globecyclers.de- pictures, even there avatarpicture....
always blue skies Manfred (HPV-Mitglied) Fragen an mich: mste200839"ät"aol.com

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Wildcate
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Beitragvon Wildcate » Sa Apr 19, 2008 11:21 am

Hi Antony,

there's been discussion in the german part whether the big Hase stand is necessary or not.
Personally, I'd recommend it if the stoker is in some way handicapped so he or she needs assistance to get on and off the bike, if you plan to carry very heavy loads (maximum cargo/load capacity) on the bike regularly, or if you ride with children as stokers (as they, too, might need assistance). Your cargo box for the front might fall under that scenario and it might not, depending on how regularly you use it and on how heavy your load will be.

We use the small stand and are quite content with it, our full gear for vacations including tent and mobile kitchen stuff weighs in at approx. 40 kg, so 70 kg together with the bike. The small stand that we have does an ok job at holding the bike even with that load on, so we haven't really wished for the large stand.
There is only one little thing: To load the lowrider with 4 bags, you need either the large Hase stand or a (homemade) extra holder to keep the front panniers apart, else you can only turn the handlebars for a few centimetres. Making that distancer is no big trouble, though, and there are pictures and how-tos in the forum already; if needed, I can translate for you.

The Hase special parts tend to be on the expensive side, and the big stand is no exception. Again, personally, if you don't ride with children/handicapped, I'd rather invest the money in some nice other gadget, like a better front light than Hase offers (current recommendation: Busch & Müller Lumotec IQ Fly) or even a hub dynamo. If you change your mind, you can also add the big stand later, though I can imagine it would be a hassle to order it across the pond.

If you plan on day and night riding in cities, I'd go for the "typical german" version of lighting, that is installed on the bike and stays there. (I don't know how it is in Canada, but removable battery lights seem to be the rule in the U.S.) The standard AXA dynamo that Hase offers with the bike works fine if adjusted properly and is fairly cheap compared to the hub dynamo option. There's only one hub dyn. that will take the strain of a tandem 20" wheel with a disc brake, and that's the SON (offered as an option by Hase, too). I have a SON dyn. on my single bike, and it's glorious, so if you want high-end lighting system with no worries about adjustment, that would be your bet. With the hub dyn., you can even buy a front light with sensor that turns your bike lights on automatically when it gets dark. Be sure to get a front and back light with standlight option, they are pretty standard over here nowadays, and it greatly adds to visibility and safety.

If your dealer has fenders, look for a very long front fender but be prepared that you might need the additional mud flap on the lowrider anyways.

I hope that helps for now!

All the best,
Kati

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Beitragvon MadFreddy » Sa Apr 19, 2008 8:16 pm

Hi Antony,
you can see our home-made solution for the 4 bags without the big Hase stand on the right hand side of this picture:
album_pic.php?pic_id=3
(which also boasts our 210mm disc brake disc :mrgreen: )
Hardware:
1/2 Pino,
Trekkingrad,
ZOX26 Liegerad,
Motorisierter Pino-Transporter

Antony

Beitragvon Antony » Di Apr 22, 2008 3:33 am

Thanks for the great answers, everyone. Since my girlfriend and I are pretty capable of balancing ourselves, I think we'll pass on the big Hase stand and ask our dealer to rig up a pannier bag brace.

Kati, the reason that Americans like removable battery-powered lights is that if you park a bicycle downtown with lights attached to it, they'll disappear very quickly! We're probably going to ride about 95% of the time in daylight, so I think we can save money by leaving off the dynamo setup as well.

With all this saved money I'd really like to get a rugged suspension fork, but it looks like Hase (for under $1000) offers a cheap Taiwanese elastomer fork, the Spinner GRIND. How has it worked for other pino riders?

Something a bit more burly with coil spring/oil damping would be much better. After all, the front wheel has 110kg on it, plus the braking torque from the front disc brake. Did Hase ever offer the MEKS SASO Carbon fork? How difficult is it to install the Pino's steering arm on an after-market suspension fork?

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Beitragvon Wildcate » Di Apr 22, 2008 11:12 am

Do the removable battery lights (if left on) get stolen, or also dynamo-powered lights? If everyone uses the battery lights, I can imagine that there would be no use at all for stolen installed lights...
But do use the battery option, if it is the better solution for you. Just make sure you can rig something to hold the front light - remember, you have no normal handlebars in the front of the bike.

The fork that Hase offers was tested by them (they have a test stand), and it must have taken the strain o.k. The main problem is that since the market for 20" tandem suspension forks with disc brake option where the stoker sits on top of the fork is limited to the amount of folks buying a Pino. I tried to find another suspension fork in that size, but to no avail.

The Spinner fork, for us, works pretty well. Our first fork was worn out after about 6500 km, and Hase replaced it with no problem. We never bottomed out either with the old or the new fork, and it does take away a lot of the humps and bumps. The cheap fork is probably sturdily built enough to take a lot of abuse.

As far as I know, the Meks fork is on trial at the moment, traveling around the world on a Pino with the globecyclers Mandy and Benny (www.globecyclers.de). If all tests turn out o.k., Hase will probably offer the fork as an option. The new Pino should already have 1 1/8" headset, so the fork is probably a bit more resilient anyway. A change of fork has not been done yet in this forum as far as I know, so no experience on it yet.

All the best,
Kati

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MadFreddy
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Beitragvon MadFreddy » Di Apr 22, 2008 5:47 pm

Antony hat geschrieben:With all this saved money I'd really like to get a rugged suspension fork, but it looks like Hase (for under $1000) offers a cheap Taiwanese elastomer fork, the Spinner GRIND. How has it worked for other pino riders?

Something a bit more burly with coil spring/oil damping would be much better. After all, the front wheel has 110kg on it, plus the braking torque from the front disc brake. Did Hase ever offer the MEKS SASO Carbon fork? How difficult is it to install the Pino's steering arm on an after-market suspension fork?


Antony,
Hase offers two different suspension forks: one is the cheaper Spinner Grind (199 Euro on their price list) - it is quite ok (30mm travel) but surely not top quality and afaik not serviceable.
The other one is the RC80 by White Brothers which has 80mm travel and adjustable air damping, but costs 799 Euro. I don't know whether it's serviceable, but as it is from the US you might find better technical support than for the Grind.

Greetings across the big pond,
Frieder
Hardware:

1/2 Pino,

Trekkingrad,

ZOX26 Liegerad,

Motorisierter Pino-Transporter

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Antony
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Beitragvon Antony » Mo Mai 12, 2008 7:04 pm

Here it is - very red! :D

The bike dealer found a few oddball rack parts to make up a twin-stand-replacement, and I rigged a bike computer mount out of an old bicycle bell and some zip-ties. Finally, I rigged a mud-flap on the lowrider rack, making one out of glued inner-tube strips.

Thanks for putting together such a great Pino resource. Can't wait to get out there.
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Antony
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Beitragvon Antony » Mo Mai 12, 2008 7:08 pm

The last challenge before the bike is trip-ready is to find some stoker-bag panniers that fit on the remaining lowrider rack space...
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MadFreddy
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Beitragvon MadFreddy » Di Mai 13, 2008 12:07 am

Congratulations to your Pino and always a pleasant ride on it!
Your twin-Stand replacement and your mudflap look great, but I would love to see a detail picture of your computer mount, too!
And where did you get the Ortlieb bags (assuming they are from Ortlieb and not a clone)? I didn't know they sell them over the big pond :mrgreen:


Greetings from Europe,
Frieder
Hardware:

1/2 Pino,

Trekkingrad,

ZOX26 Liegerad,

Motorisierter Pino-Transporter

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Antony
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Beitragvon Antony » Fr Mai 16, 2008 8:45 pm

Just put detailed shots of the bike computer mount here. Genuine Ortlieb bags can be found here in Canada... for a price :lol:. We could only afford one pair, and picked up the rest of our bags from Canada's favorite outdoor store MEC.

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MadFreddy
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Beitragvon MadFreddy » Sa Mai 17, 2008 10:30 am

Antony hat geschrieben:Just put detailed shots of the bike computer mount here. Genuine Ortlieb bags can be found here in Canada... for a price :lol:. We could only afford one pair, and picked up the rest of our bags from Canada's favorite outdoor store MEC.


I hope you'll find that the Ortlieb bags are worth every penny - I have a real old pair which saw lots of use and abuse and they are still in near perfect condition. And when you ride in bad weather it's really nice to know that your stuff will still be perfectly dry in the evening!
Btw, nice computer mount!

Frieder
Hardware:

1/2 Pino,

Trekkingrad,

ZOX26 Liegerad,

Motorisierter Pino-Transporter


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